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Captain America: The Right Kind of Hero

Not since the first Spider-Man hit the big screen had I been looking forward to catching a superhero at the cineplex as Captain America this summer.

After all, I remember as a small boy being hooked on the alter ego of Steve Rogers, a frail young man who was enhanced to the peak of human perfection by an experimental serum in order to aid the United States' World War II effort. read more

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How to Win ANY Battle in Life

You've tried it your way and failed. Don't give up! Choose to stay in the game and see how God even takes our mistakes and builds them into our greatest victories.

How many times have we heard this one: “It doesn't matter if you win or lose, it's how you play the game that counts.” Some of us realized winning meant a lot when we noticed that the guys who got the girls were the ones who won the starting positions on the team. Even if how they played the game was anything but nice, they still won and got the girls.

Go out in life thinking that winning does not matter and you will be very disappointed. Winning matters a lot.

Winners get the best stuff. The world talks about and celebrates winners, while it shuns the loser who seems to not have what it takes or has it for a while and then loses it. Few can tell you who raced in the Indianapolis 500 in any given year. The winners are the ones that count.

Your Personal Battles
Everybody struggles with something and battles it day after day. Your main battle might be overeating, pornography, drinking, anger, depression or one of many other things that could have been tripping you up, perhaps for years.

You have made two choices that most everybody else has made: (1) You have tried real hard to fix it yourself; (2) You have asked God to take the battle from you and just heal it right now.

You may have begged Him and even questioned whether or not there actually is a God, or whether or not He loves you based on the fact that your battle has continued. You may have even defended your problem, saying it is just the way God made you since He hasn't seen fit to change it for you.

It is always good to ask for God's healing, but if you are still struggling, still losing the battle, now is the time to make some different choices that will turn your life around.

When dealing with your innermost battles, keep in mind that winners are not just those men who develop a plan for their life, go out and execute it and then watch everything fall perfectly in place. Winning also comes from the response we choose when things don't go so well.

Great coaches train the team to go out and win. But championship coaches take it a step further: They train their teams to respond when the other team scores first. Great teams know how to come back when they are behind. It is the response to things not going well that often determines whether or not a team wins or loses. The same goes with individuals.

You have a choice of how to respond when things go wrong. Most likely there is some area, some battle in which you have experienced defeat over and over again. Now you have choices before you that will either turn your life into a succession of loss upon loss or a life defined in every way by winning.

Giving Up Old Choices
One choice in response to mistakes and personal failures is arrogant defensiveness. This is the choice to justify, rationalize and stand your ground. It is the choice down a path of repeated failures and stunted growth. I have used this response often and have to surrender it up every day.

It always feels good for the moment to exercise my right to defend what I did and stand my ground. But it never helps me move forward, and, eventually, I have to acknowledge my arrogance and let it go.

I have to replace the choice to remain stubborn, resistant, arrogant and defensive with the choice of a winner. It is the unattractive choice of humble willingness.

The Choice of Humble Willingness
Those who are both humble and willing realize they do not have all the answers, and they are willing to do whatever it takes to find them. This place of humility allows them to seek help from others and shift their reliance from themselves to God.

Proverbs 3:5-7 tells us to not lean on our own understanding and to not be wise in our own eyes. A humble willingness to do whatever it takes, to reach out and get the help that is needed is a sign of character and strength. It is the beginning of the path to the victory circle. But to get there you have to allow God to use your struggle to teach you to rely less on your own resources and totally on Him.

Over the years I have watched people reach this crucial point where they are willing to do whatever it takes, and I have watched everything in their lives turn around. I have also seen those who reach the point and turn and run in the opposite direction. The biggest reason is that they are unwilling to make a bold move toward healing.

You can't just declare yourself a winner. You have to heal the things that are preventing you from having victory. The biggest reason you have lost the battle is that you have relied on your own strength, trying to win on your own.

Once you are humbly willing, you can move to connect your life with others who can help you. This means that you are willing to call someone or get in the car and go to a meeting or find a counselor to help you. In humble willingness, tell your wife or close friend that you are finally willing to look into getting some help that they suggested. Humbly acknowledge that you are only as sick as your secrets, and you must break out of secrecy and into connection that heals and helps you to win whatever battles you are facing.

The winning life starts by moving beyond trying harder and merely asking for healing. You give up the old ways and defending the old ways, and you are willing to become involved in the healing by reaching out and connecting.

The connection begins the healing process that will include several difficult processes, such as grieving your past losses so you can move forward. It may involve forgiving those who have hurt you, and giving up old resentments and grudges. And rather than numb your feelings or deny they are there, you will need to acknowledge them and feel the depths of your emotions.

Then, as the reality of your situation becomes clearer, it will require that you embrace your life, the good and the bad of it all, and allow God to do with it what only God can do.

Embracing Rather Than Rejecting Life
God takes our mistakes and blends them and builds them into our biggest wins. I know that may sound strange, but it is true.

You're probably familiar with the Old Testament story of Joseph. The guy went from being the favorite son in his father's house to the depths of an Egyptian prison. Some would say that he had it coming.

Joseph was so arrogant that he was not smart enough to edit what he tells his brothers about God's plan for his life: “One night Joseph had a dream and promptly reported the details to his brothers, causing them to hate him even more. 'Listen to this dream,' he announced. 'We were out in the field tying up bundles of grain. My bundle stood up, and then your bundles all gathered around and bowed low before it!' 'So you are going to be our king, are you?' his brothers taunted. And they hated him all the more for his dream and what he had said” (Gen. 37:5-8, NLT).

So Joseph's brothers decided to kill him, but they changed their minds and sold him into slavery instead. He found favor with his new master only to be thrown in jail after the lady of the house lied about Joseph, accusing him of an impropriety. At some point, I'm sure Joseph was kicking himself for the way he had bragged to his brothers, which started the chain of events leading to his imprisonment. But he didn't give up.

In prison he connected with his fellow inmates, telling them what their dreams meant and that eventually led to his release. Once again, he gained favor by telling Pharaoh what his dreams meant and ended up running the country, enabling him to save his family and, ultimately, an entire nation.

Now, I don't think God meant for those mean brothers to sell Joseph or for him to be falsely accused and thrown in prison. But, somehow, God worked out a big win in the end. As Joseph notes, “God turned into good” what his brothers meant for evil (Gen. 50:20).

You may feel like you are living in your own self-constructed prison. You may think your life is wasted and you are the loser of all losers. But it is not true. If you will stay true to God, God will work with your circumstances and weave them into a wonderful win. But you must humble yourself and become willing to do whatever it takes to heal.

You must reach out and connect with others, getting support, accountability and even treatment for the character defects within you. You must open up your life to others and allow God to manage the outcome. Then you must embrace the reality of your life and allow God to use the things you are most ashamed of. Allow God to weave them and wind them into your future.

Perseverance
The final element to win at anything is perseverance. Whether it is a personal battle or a new project, be in it for the long haul.

Too often, we want the quick fix and the instant solution. We want the big win now and when it does not happen, we give up, throw in the towel and walk away a loser. But if we persevere, hang on and hang in, the win we so badly want may be just around the corner.

Here is how perseverance worked for me. One of the things I feel best about in my life is the creation of the Women of Faith conference. God gave me a vision for discouraged and disappointed women, and we began conferences for women in 1996. Now, almost 15 years later, they are stronger than ever with more than 3 million women having attended, more than 400,000 attending each year. Nothing has ever made me feel more like a winner than the success of Women of Faith and the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been changed by it.

But in 1995, the year before the conferences started, I felt like the biggest loser around. It was then that I created a traveling conference that toured the country in 12 cities. That year, my efforts at creating conferences resulted in a grand total of less than 1,000 people showing up … total.

I remember the grand ballroom in Chicago where we had less than 30. No one looked like or felt like a bigger loser than me. But I did not take the loss as an indictment on who I was. A losing idea and the mistakes I made in implementing it did not make me a total failure. So I persevered with conferences, and it was the next year that Women of Faith started filling every seat available.

Had I given up, I would have never experienced the joy of seeing Women of Faith become the ministry that it is today. The win was not in pulling it off. The win was persevering with God and watching Him do what I had proved I could not do alone.

Perhaps you are about to give up. You don't feel there is any hope for you. If I were sitting there with you, I would encourage you to look for the big win just around the bend or just over the next hill. You may not see it, but it is there.

Stand strong in God's Spirit and resist Satan's lies that you will fail. Take Paul's encouragement in Ephesians 6:10-13 to heart: “Be strong with the Lord's mighty power. Put on all of God's armor so that you will be able to stand firm against all strategies and tricks of the Devil. For we are not fighting against people made of flesh and blood, but against the evil rulers and authorities of the unseen world, against those mighty powers of darkness who rule this world, and against wicked spirits in the heavenly realms. Use every piece of God's armor to resist the enemy in the time of evil, so that after the battle you will still be standing firm.”

No matter how low you feel or the degree of humiliation you have experienced, you can choose to keep going and stay in the game rather than quit right before you see what God is about to do. Your loss could actually be the springboard to living the life of a winner because of what you have experienced and what you have learned in the heat of battle. But to experience the life of a winner, you must have a willingness to wait on God and to persevere.

Rather than give up on life, I encourage you to give up your old ways of handling your battles and turn your life over to God. Trust in Him and those He chooses to use to help you. You will heal, and you will win. And, you will find purpose for your life that you never dreamed possible.

Romans 8:28 will unfold before your eyes over your lifetime: God really “causes everything to work together for the good.” But first you must choose to win His way and not your own. And once you experience winning God's way, you will want to share the message with others and help them understand the path toward creating a winning life.

KEYS TO WINNING ANY BATTLE

  • Give up your old ways of trying to win.
  • Give up arrogant defensiveness and stubborn resistance.
  • Humble yourself and become willing to do whatever it takes.
  • Reach out and connect with those who can help you heal.
  • Heal old wounds by grieving your losses, forgiving those who hurt you and feeling the depths of your emotions.
  • Embrace the reality of your life, including the past you want to forget.
  • Persevere and watch God create something amazing from it all.
  • Reach out to others who need to find the way to win.

Steve Arterburn is the founder and chairman of New Life Ministries and hosts the nationally syndicated Christian counseling talk show New Life Live. He also serves as a teaching pastor at Heartland Church in Indianapolis and is the author and co-author of more than 60 books, including Every Man's Battle. Contact him at newlife.com. read more

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Suffering: Why We Shouldn't Try to Avoid It

C. S. Lewis wrote in The Problem of Pain: "If God were good, He would wish to make His creatures perfectly happy, and if God were almighty, He would be able to do what He wished. But the creatures are not happy. Therefore, God lacks either goodness, or power, or both. This is the problem of pain in its simplest form."

Of the many questions raised by suffering and evil, these four capture most of the heart issues:

  1. Does God know? (the issue of His omniscience)
  2. Does God care?·(the issue of His benevolence and love)
  3. Can He do anything about it? (the issue of His omnipotence)
  4. If He knows, cares, and can do something about it, why doesn't He?·(the·issue of His purposes and will)

So much about suffering and evil remains opaque and impenetrable. On the other hand, a lot is knowable. read more

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The Trouble With Christian Phrases


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When CNN posted an article on its Belief Blog asking, “Do you speak Christian?” author John Blake looked into the various phrases that Christians use to describe things, like being “born again,” that may be confusing to those outside the Christian culture. It’s actually a pretty poor article that merely catalogs a bunch of phrases the author seems to find amusing, but it brings up an important point. Are you aware of the words and phrases you are using in your everyday life and how others, especially nonbelievers, perceive them?

This is a debate that goes on in many churches and ministries across the country. Our culture is less Christian and less knowledgeable about Christian ideas than at any point in its history. We can’t assume that our co-workers and neighbors are going to understand a lot of words and phrases that we take for granted, especially those of us who have grown up in the church.

If I tell my co-workers that I have been “saved by grace,” many of them would have no idea what that means. Terms like that are so common to Christians that we don’t even notice when we’re using them. But it is important to be aware; because if we use phrases like that with people who don’t understand, it can be off-putting. It hints to them at a special group—a special language that only insiders understand.

Unfortunately we are not talking about something as tangible or simple as what we had for breakfast. In Christianity God reveals himself to us, and we are dealing with ideas and concepts that aren’t normally discussed at the water cooler. We have to be able to describe these ideas; and so, naturally, we are forced to use words that many people do not use in their everyday lives. The word justification explains a very important, essential Christian idea, but it’s not exactly trending on Twitter right now.

There’s nothing wrong with having words and phrases that explain important concepts, as it allows us to discuss our faith intelligibly. The issue lies in how and when we use these words and how comfortable we get with them. It’s all about knowing your audience.

I remember when I was in college leading a Bible study of mature Christian guys. We were studying Romans and throwing around a lot of these words and phrases because everyone understood them and was comfortable using them. Then in the middle of the semester, one of our members brought a non-Christian friend with him. Immediately we had to change the tone of the study so he wouldn’t feel left out or ignorant. My co-leader and I kept catching ourselves saying things he might not understand. We started re-phrasing. We still studied the same material and discussed the same subjects, but we had to be mindful of our new audience. read more

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'The Ides of March' Delivers the Chill of Political Corruption

The Ides of March is a well-executed but unoriginal drama that features an incredible cast and serves as a coming out party for Ryan Gosling’s status as a major leading actor. What this movie lacks in originality and creative writing, it more than makes up for in the acting and directing, making it one of the best dramas of the fall movie season.

Gosling (pictured here with actor/director George Clooney) stars as an up-and-coming political staffer who gets corrupted while trying to win a presidential election. Again, there’s nothing groundbreaking about the plot (really, politics can corrupt people!?), but when you throw in George Clooney, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Paul Giamatti, Jeffrey Wright and a surprisingly good Marisa Tomei, every scene becomes a pleasure to watch.

Gosling is in every scene, and he’s magnetic. There’s no overacting here. When he starts having to make the morally questionable decisions, you can tell he’s torn, but it’s underneath the surface. He knows his character and makes him believable in every scene. After breaking out with The Notebook and then working his considerable talents on a number of indie films for the last six years, it was time for him to step up to the plate with a leading role in a mainstream Hollywood movie. Combined with his charismatic, hilarious performance in Crazy, Stupid, Love, it feels like Gosling is finally hitting the big time in 2011, and it’s good to have him.

The funny thing is that Gosling is overshadowed in a number of scenes by Hoffman and Giamatti, who absolutely kill their roles as rival political campaign bosses. Watching these guys chew cigars while dishing political barbs is an absolute joy. Tomei and Wright get limited time but make the most of it, and Evan Rachel Wood gives a compelling turn as an intern on the campaign.

I haven’t even mentioned Clooney yet, and that’s because his role as the seemingly perfect politician almost comes as an afterthought in this movie. Clooney actually did much better work directing The Ides of March than acting in it. He plays down the glitz of politics in favor of the gritty details, which works well given that the film takes place almost entirely in Ohio. This is not Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and that’s a good thing. If you’re looking for solid, well-acted drama to see, you can’t go wrong with The Ides of March.

Content Watch: Not for the kids. The movie features pervasive language. There is no nudity, but the film deals with mature subjects, including abortion. read more

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Thor: Hammer Time for Action, Adventure

If Spider-Man's creed is "with great power comes great responsibility," the mantra of Thor could easily be "with great power comes great arrogance."

The latest superhero movie from Marvel Studios, Thor features an out-of-this-world arrogant, reckless and selfish warrior (Chris Hemsworth), who is about to be named king of the mystical kingdom of Asgard by his father, Odin (Anthony Hopkins). But Thor's reckless actions reignite an ancient war with the frost giants—a provocation that runs counter of Odin’s advice: “a wise king never seeks out war, but he must always be ready for it.”

Odin justly calls Thor a "vain, greedy, cruel boy," but the son fires back with, "You are an old man and a fool!" Bad move, as his father removes Thor’s power, and casts him and his mighty hammer Mjolnir to Earth—forcing him to live among humans. Speaking of Thor’s hammer, it can be thrown like a boomerang, spun like nunchucks and can alter the weather—"a weapon to destroy or a tool to build," according to King Odin.

From a celestial sword-and-sorcery fantasy ala The Lord of the Rings, the film then becomes a fish-out-of-water action/comedy as Thor must adjust to the new world around him, while earthlings are dumbfounded by his Viking ego and mannerisms. For example, he storms into a diner and yells “I need SUSTENANCE,” and “I need a HORSE” as he stumbles into a hamster-and-hound-packed pet store.

The best parts of the movie are when Thor is banished to Earth, and he must find out what it takes to be a true hero when his crafty half-brother, Loki (Tom Hiddleston), threatens the whole planet. After he  crash-lands in a New Mexico desert, Thor literally runs into astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), and he must learn to embrace a humble attitude to become heroic.

Despite earning more than $440 million at the global box office this summer, I was leery to watch Thor largely because the character was heavily promoted in the box office as the “god of thunder.” Getting over my trepidation, I decided to catch the movie's recent release on DVD and Blu-ray. After all, I recall as a youngster reading about the Mighty Thor—a superhero who doesn't have a costume to be the hero when he was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby for Marvel Comics back in the 1960s.

Thor, Odin, Loki and other denizens of Asgard are "gods," according to Norse myth and in Marvel's original comic books. In the film, the inhabitants of Asgard don't see themselves as gods, although they acknowledge that they were taken to be such when they came to Earth about a thousand years ago. Although they possess god-like powers and reside in a heavenly place, the movie portrays them as aliens from a faraway world—a realm where science and magic are basically one and the same.

By getting around this cloudy spirituality, the film does offer a nod to Christianity, turning Thor into a Christ-figure when Loki sends a robotic Destroyer to eliminate his stepbrother and Earth's inhabitants.

Best known for film adaptations of several plays by William Shakespeare, director Kenneth Branagh deftly handles direct this large-scale superhero drama as he wisely sets the stage for a Shakespeare-like fallen hero who must find humility in order to rise to greatness. Thor is a worthwhile summer flick, offering plenty of hammer-wielding action, but it's not exceptional as Captain America—which I'll save for another review.

Besides deleted scenes, featurettes and teasers for next summer's The Avengers, the next superhero movie from Marvel Studios, the DVD and Blu-ray features the first "Marvel One Shot"—short films that are meant to link The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man and Thor, members of the Avengers. The short stars S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division) man-on-the-ground Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg).

Content Watch: The film is rated PG-13 for sequences of intense sci-fi action and violence, and brief, light foul language. It features some family-friendly content, although I wouldn't recommend the film for children 10 and under because of the scary frost giants and relentless battles. Although there's no sex or profanity, Thor is seen out-drinking another character. Parents should discuss with youngsters the difference between the gods of Norse mythology and the one true God. read more

Props for 'Mr. Popper's Penguins'

My three young boys were not Jim Carrey fans, but that changed this summer when Alex, Andrew and Chase saw trailers of the rubber-faced actor in Mr. Popper's Penguins.

After reading the 1939 Newbery Award-winning children's book with my wife, Tammy, last year, the brothers were excited to watch the “loose film adaptation” of Richard and Florence Atwater's classic in 1938. In the book, Popper is a house painter who starts breeding trained penguins and takes his animal act on the road, creating a national sensation.

In the 2011 contemporary movie version, Carrey plays Popper, a successful Donald Trump-like real estate mogul, whose cold relationship with his family warms up after he “inherits” six cute but trouble-making penguins from Antarctica from his recently-deceased father. read more

Wisdom From Wooden

John Wooden is someone I have always looked up to as a role model and a hero. Coach Wooden, who was nicknamed the "Wizard of Westwood," led the UCLA Bruins basketball teams of the 1960s and 1970s to a never-since-equaled 10 NCAA National Championships.

All those titles came during his last 12 coaching seasons, including seven in a row from 1967 to 1973. His UCLA teams also had a record-setting winning streak of 88 games and four perfect 30-0 seasons, and won 38 straight games in NCAA tournament play. read more

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'X-Men: First Class' Best of the Series

With four comic-book movies coming out this summer, X-Men: First Class seemed to draw the least amount of excitement. “Another X-Men movie?” seemed to be the common thought. However, X-Men: First Class surprisingly turns out to be the best movie about Xavier’s mutants so far, and it may turn out to be the best comic movie of the summer.

Set mostly in the '60s, the film details the story of the beginning of the X-Men, and, more importantly, the beginning of the relationship between Charles Xavier and Magneto. It’s this relationship and the two actors, James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender, that bring it to life and really set this movie above your normal comic action-fest.

The plot follows Xavier and Magneto as they grow up in very different childhoods, one with a privileged upbringing and one in a Nazi concentration camp (guess which one ends up turning into a bad guy). As they grow older, they cross each other’s paths in search of the movie’s villain, a mutant who is arranging the Cuban Missile Crisis in hopes of starting World War III. They form a team to deal with the threat, and the first class of X-Men is born. read more

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Father-Son Missions Adventures

With Father’s Day coming up, we took some time to speak with David Horner, pastor of Providence Baptist Church in Raleigh, N.C. Horner is the author of When Missions Shape the Mission, which examines America’s role in world missions. Passionate about spreading the gospel abroad, Horner also took his three sons on mission trips as each turned 16 and had memorable and life-changing experiences with them. He details these accounts to us and recommends other ways fathers can give their children a heart for missions. read more

Hornets in the Middle East

When I was about 10 years old, I fell into a hornets’ nest. The hornets got caught in my clothing. The more I fought, the more they stung me. Later I counted about 20 stings. It was a painful few days, but I survived. Every now and then, I see someone caught up in a flurry of painful but meaningless activity.  I am reminded of my childhood experience and often use the age-old expression, “They fell into a hornets’ nest.” Most Americans agree that President Obama fell into a Middle Eastern hornets’ nest during the last few months. Despite the toppling of totalitarian states and the possibility of the establishment of new democracy, it is difficult to see a realistic end to the terrorism, bloodshed, and warfare in this important region of the world.   

The death of Osama Bin Laden marked a symbolic end to America’s war on terrorism. National jubilation is the only way to describe our corporate feeling about the demise of this “arch enemy” of everything Americans stand for. Perhaps this euphoric victory led the administration’s foreign policy strategists into a subtle state of hubris. This false feeling of power may have convinced them that they could actually advance the peace process by imposing the US will on the Palestinian/Israeli peace process.

The entire nation is aware that on Thursday May 19, the president declared Middle Eastern peace talks could only progress if Israel would agree to return to their 1967 boundaries. After a veritable maelstrom of rebuttals, the president's international policy team realized the error of their ways. Therefore, the next Sunday morning (5-22-11) the president retracted his peace talk ultimatum. He even went so far as to claim that he was misquoted. His clarification speech occurred at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee's (AIPAC) annual meeting in Washington, DC. Despite the public acquiescence of former Prime Minister Netanyahu, the president seemed to create even more controversy. As I walked through the more than 11,000 pro-Israel advocates, I heard everything from motherly articulation of forgiveness to numerous people declaring they would never vote for President Obama again.     read more

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Becoming Vulnerable

For to be sure, he was crucified in weakness, yet he lives by God's power. Likewise, we are weak in him, yet by God's power we will live with him to serve you. —2 Corinthians 13:4 read more

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One in a Billion

Coaching wizard John Wooden modeled Christian character

Former players, university officials and friends eulogized John Wooden at a public memorial service June 26, remembering the legendary UCLA Bruins men’s basketball coach as a dedicated family man and a wise teacher who lived out the values of his renowned Pyramid of Success, which includes the component of faith.

“Coach Wooden was one in a billion,” said former Bruins and Los Angeles Lakers player Jamaal Wilkes. “Coach lived a Christian life, and he died a Christian death.”

Current UCLA men’s basketball coach Ben Howland described Wooden as a humble man. “His basic nature was love,” Howland said. read more

Make Room for Daddy!


We recently wrote a book for moms about the unique and vital role dads play in parenting. It's called Make Room for Daddy: A Mom's Guide to Letting Dad Be Dad. In researching the book, we questioned hundreds of moms and dads about the differences between mothers and fathers, and what dads need most in order to be the best dads they can be.

Bottom line (you like to get to the bottom line, don't you?), you can help your wife to help you by telling her about your needs as a father. These "Five Talking Points About Fathering" should get you started: read more

The Doc's Top 10 Summer Sports

Keep in shape and sharpen your competitive edge in the backyard or on the field.

This summer, you have a chance to get outdoors, pump some fresh air into your lungs, work up a sweat and bond with the guys or your family. Without further adieu, here are my top 10 summer sports for shaping you into a "new man:" read more

Enter the 'Overload Zone'

 

The sacred time called 'when things slow down' always seems out of reach for most men.

 

So your profession is very demanding and you carry a heavy workload. You pull a couple of all-nighters every now and then, plus give up a few weekends to go to work. What's the big sweat? Someone's got to pay the bills, right?

Look at your return: You get that water-cooler reputation and recognition in the workplace as being successful--a real company man. read more

Longer Life?


Will biotechnology stretch our legacies out longer, or are the ethical implications too damaging?

 

Although escaping mortality is out of the question, stretching its boundaries may not be, according to new discoveries in genetic research.

Geneticists discovered how to lengthen the life span of animals and insects by the alteration of a single gene. Though companies form to benefit from any future application to humans, some are raising questions about the ethical implications of such a process.

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Good Eats


Summer will soon be here and millions will decide to trim the fat by exercising in the sunny weather. But jogging a mile each day won't help anyone if their diet consists of Big Macs and fries.

Here are some healthy foods, as listed on CNN.com, that can help you achieve your fitness goals--and that don't taste like carpet lint. read more

The Conditioned Couple


How does marriage affect your health? More than you know!

 

God told Adam that it was not good for him to be alone. Then, God did one of the riskiest things ever. He made woman.

But before woman came, Adam was quite self-sufficient--he ruled the garden. He fed himself; he never had to shower; and he was free to roam wherever, whenever. Let's face it, the guy was living in bachelor paradise.

If the story ended there, our lives today would be just a little different: No steak and no sex. Fortunately, there is more to the story.

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