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Jamaican orphanage raises children on coffee

Jamaican orphanage raises children on coffee

In the mountains near Kingston, Jamaica, City of Refuge Children’s Home is cultivating two of the country’s most precious resources: children and coffee. 

Assemblies of God missionaries Steve and Kim Puffpaff decided to open a children’s home after witnessing countless orphaned children living on the streets. In 2002, thanks to donations, the couple purchased property in Jamaica’s Blue Mountains and transformed a former luxury hotel on the property into a children’s home. read more

Angelic Bodyguards

Angelic Bodyguards

Psalm 91, which speaks of God’s divine protection, takes on new meaning when angels come to the rescue. Such was the case for Mike Disanza of the New York City Police Department, whose angelic encounter is highlighted in Peggy Joyce Ruth’s latest book, Psalm 91:

 

Over my system came the message: 72nd Street and Broadway, Manhattan! I knew the meaning of the code: Cop in trouble and needs assistance. I rushed to the subway and there was a crowd of people around the cop who refused to let him get his prisoner. I walked directly over and cuffed the prisoner, which made the crowd go wild.

One man shouted: “Here comes the train! Let’s throw the cop in the subway!” The crowd converted into a mob. I felt myself moving toward the subway track, being pushed by this angry crowd who was intending to hurl me onto the tracks in front of the speeding train. I could hear the sound and see the lights of the oncoming train in the tunnel. 

Being a new Christian, I cried out the best prayer I knew: “Jesus help!” Suddenly, these two big guys in the crowd started pushing the mob out of our way. They parted the crowd, got over to me and said, “Follow us!” I grabbed the prisoner and followed them as they made a path for us—and felt the other cop right on my heels hanging onto my jacket. The two men ushered us back to the patrol car and I loaded the prisoner in the back seat. He was still screaming his mouth off about how he hated cops. I turned around to thank the two strangers, but was surprised that neither of them was there. Oh, well, I thought, and muttered my thanks to them anyway.

I jumped in and the other cop got in next to the driver. He thanked me gratefully for my help. I deflected the compliment and said, “Thank God for those two big guys pushing the crowd apart, telling us to follow them and moving us to the car!”

“I didn’t hear nothing. I didn’t see nothing,” he said. “And I never heard anyone tell us to follow them.” 

Puzzled, I asked, “Eddie, how could you not see the men? You were right behind us!”

When I turned around, I suddenly saw a 3-D message through the glass: Angels are ministering spirits to help those who will believe. It was at that moment I realized what had happened and said to myself, My gosh, those guys were angels!

God really does give His angels charge concerning us (see Ps. 91:11). read more

Life After Death Row

Life After Death Row

In 1974, Army veteran William Moore returned to his Georgia home to find that his estranged wife had become a drug addict. Her addiction left him with little money to provide for their 4-year-old son, and in an act of desperation, Moore attempted to burglarize the home of an elderly man. But the robbery turned violent, and Moore murdered the 77-year-old. 

The former soldier pled guilty to robbery and murder charges and was given the death penalty. Through the next 16 years in prison he accepted Christ and began praying with other inmates and preaching the gospel to them. He also taught inmates to read and write and assisted them in appealing their sentences. “I’d do anything to help anyone so long as I was not focusing on me,” he said. 

While in prison Moore received 15 stays of execution,  and his death sentence eventually was reduced to life. In 1991, he was paroled. Moore is now the only self-confessed death-row inmate in Georgia to be released. The  victim’s family members, who are Christians, all spoke to the appeals board on Moore’s behalf. 

Moore says his freedom is a testament to God’s grace. “The only thing that I can say is Jesus Christ, that’s the answer,” Moore told Charisma. “Beyond that, Billy Moore isn’t a special person. It’s just God’s grace.”

Moore is now an ordained minister with the Pentecostal Assemblies of God denomination and travels the country sharing his testimony and preaching the gospel.  read more

With this ring...I give to the poor

With This Ring...I Give to the poor

Would you donate your wedding ring to a worthy cause if you knew it meant a child living in Africa would have clean drinking water for years to come? That’s the purpose behind With This Ring (WTR), a ministry dedicated to building wells in Third World countries. “We take to heart the command of Jesus when He says that we should sell our possessions and give the money to the poor,” says Ali Eastburn, executive director of WTR. “We believe that if we can learn to give radically, we can literally change the world for Jesus.” To donate your ring, first have it appraised for cut, style and estimated worth. If the cost of the appraisal is more than the ring, WTR recommends that you sell it and donate the proceeds to the ministry. If the ring is worth more than $500, go to withthisring.org and follow the steps to donate your jewelry. read more


Using the Unusual

Amena Brown doesn’t always close her eyes and sway to music while in praise and worship at church. Sometimes she stands in front of the congregation and performs worshipful, hard-hitting “spoken-word poetry” to music. Brown, who also ministers her thought-provoking poetry to young adults at Fusion and Passion conferences across the country, says that everyone should let God use whatever gifts they have—not just the “popular” gifts usually used in church. “I’m always really big on encouraging young people to do what’s in your heart,” Brown told Charisma. “Do what you’re passionate about. You’re never too young or too old to start doing the passion that God put in your heart.”

An Inconvenient Savior

 

Jesus is no convenient savior
He is agitation to the prideful religious
He is the truth in love to the

 

Heart of a sinner

He did not call us to finding cotton-like

 

comfort in Christianity
He called us to live honestly,

 

turn over tables for justice,

love the unloved and unloving

In Jesus there is no comfort zone,

 

no playing it safe
There is feeling the tremble of fear and

 

 

letting it propel you to do His will
Holding His hand in the dark and letting 
Him lead you where you can’t see

 

-Amena Brown read more

Laughter in the Dark

Laughter in the Dark

Christian funnyman Michael Jr. has performed on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel Live! and the Comedy Central network. But instead of settling for smiles from TV audiences, he took his jokes to unlikely venues—prisons, homeless shelters and safehouses for the abused and HIV patients. Charisma spoke with him about his comedy tour to these depressing places that’s chronicled in his upcoming film, Comedy: The Road Less Traveled, set to release in September. 

Charisma: Why did you decide to leave the normal setting for a comedy show and take your routine to people in desperate situations?

Michael Jr.About a year and a half ago I was headlining in a club in Los Angeles in a well-to-do area. Most of the time when a comedian gets on stage he wants to get laughter. That night God said, “Don’t go out there to get laughter from people, go out there and give them an opportunity to laugh.” [That statement] changed everything I did. After the show I walked outside and there were a lot of people around me wanting my autograph and smiling. I looked across the street and saw a homeless guy with the exact opposite look on his face than those around me. After I saw this guy, I asked myself, How can I take comedy to him? What would that look like? Then we decided do this film called Comedy: The Road Less Traveled, and we went on a tour.

Charisma: You visited the Samaritan House in Fort Worth, Texas, which houses homeless people with HIV; The Dolphin House in Montrose, Colo., which cares for children abused by their drug-addicted parents; and youth and adult prisons. How did you incorporate their very serious, sad circumstances into your comedy shows?

Michael Jr.: I have no idea how it happened. In every location I went to, it was pretty phenomenal ... but to be real with you, I was a little afraid. I would think: Everyone in this room has HIV, they’re homeless or they have some sort of other issue. And now I’m going to tell jokes. How will I be received?

In an adult prison, I’m sitting there praying: “[God], I need a joke right up front, so I can be funny—immediately.” I was going to say, “You guys are a captive audience!” But because I was afraid, I didn’t do that one. But there was an old white guy right up front [in the audience] named Moses. He had a white beard, so I looked at him and said, “Moses, when I read about you in the Bible you were doing better than this. What happened?”

I said, “Moses, this is what I want you to do: I want you to look the prison guard directly in his eyes. I want you to say, ‘Let my people go.’” The whole room burst out laughing, and we had a fabulous time from that point on. In most locations there was something there that really allowed me to connect [with my audience].

In this film you actually get to see these transformations. In the Samaritan House a guy approached me and said, “I want you to know I haven’t laughed like this in over 20 years, since I was diagnosed with AIDS.” It was at that moment that I knew this thing was bigger than just going and telling jokes to people.

Charisma: That’s exciting. What kind of reaction have you seen so far from people watching the film?

Michael Jr.: We’ve done a few small screenings. After people see this film they want to do something. A lady in Orlando saw the film and [told me], “On Wednesdays, I’m opening up my [dance] studio to teach homeless kids how to dance ballet.” It just blew me away. She comes up with this because of seeing this film. There are other people doing the same kind of stuff.

Charisma: Though you’re a Christian comedian, you’ve performed in both religious and secular venues. How has your faith affected your craft?

Michael Jr.: I have an understanding that my comedy and the things that I do are way bigger than me. It’s just a gift that I have, and it’s only really a gift if I am willing to give it away—not just to those who can afford it, but more importantly to those who really need it.

The Bible says in Proverbs 17:22: “A merry heart does good like medicine” If it’s a medicine and it does good for you, shouldn’t we give medicine to those who really need it—to those who are sick? It just makes sense to me.

 


 

Your Turn

How can you use your gifts for good? It’s not as hard as you may think. Here are a few easy ideas.

1.
 If you are a seamstress, why not use your abilities to provide clothes for the less fortunate? You could even offer to teach classes at women’s shelters in your area.

2. Can you read?  Why not volunteer at an orphanage or nursing home. Taking time to read to someone could mean the world to a person who feels abandoned.

3. If you’re a great business person, look into teaching interview skills at a homeless shelter. Some people just need a little direction  to get back on their feet.  read more

Soaring Above the Downturn

Soaring Above the Downturn

While businesses across the nation are struggling to survive the economic nose dive, charismatic entrepreneur Mark Sterns says his successful aviation business, Higher Power Aviation, is soaring because of Christ.

“The first thing we did as a company was to dedicate it to the Lord,” says Sterns, an Oral Roberts University graduate who co-founded his company with a partner 15 years ago. “Not only did we want it to be a business, but also for it to be a ministry.”

Sterns is president of the Fort Worth, Texas, training school, which has funneled more than 2,000 pilots to Southwest Airlines and trained astronauts and actors to take flight. He says that his Christian values have helped his school gain the reputation within the aviation industry as the premier flight school.

“For many of those pilots who want to go to Southwest Airlines, they’ll talk amongst themselves and say: ‘Oh, you want to go to Southwest? Call on Higher Power. ‘ And they don’t realize what they just said.” 

Sterns says that although his business operates in the private sector, demonstrating Christ has still been possible.

“What we have been able to do by just living and ministering through our business … [is give others] permission to live lives of faith in their professions,” Sterns says.  read more

Making the invisible visible

Making the Invisible Visible

Armed with a video camera, an iPhone and a bag of socks, Mark Horvath travels the country capturing compelling stories of America’s homeless. He uses the footage as well as social media to share and supply needs for some of these poverty-stricken individuals and families.

In 2009 Horvath drove a car packed with Hanes socks across the country to raise awareness for the homeless and posted his candid videos on InvisiblePeople.tv. At times, some of his 6,000-plus Twitter followers have met him at grocery stores around the country to buy food, clothes and other supplies for the families he encounters.

Horvath feels drawn to minister to homeless people because he’s lived on the streets himself. He insists that he’s not “called” to this work—he’s forced. “If you’re called, you can hang up the phone,” Horvath says. “I don’t have any choice.”

Horvath’s life story has the ups and downs of a roller-coaster ride. After a career in the TV industry, Horvath ended up on the streets. He got back on his feet thanks to the commitment of the Dream Center, a Los Angeles church.

But in 2005 his six-figure income instantly disappeared after losing his job. Only weeks away from homelessness—again—Horvath used the opportunity to launch InvisiblePeople.tv

“Don’t waste a good crisis,” Horvath advises. “Tonight there are people who were homeless that are sleeping inside because I had the courage—or I was dumb enough—to drive around the country.”

 


  read more

Messiah among the Maasai

Messiah among the Maasai

How a God-hating tribal warrior found Jesus 

I was the instigator of all the trouble among my tribe. If there was mischief to be done, I was leading it. I was vicious.

People were leaving our traditional Maasai ways. Some of the older people lost faith in our witchdoctors and started worshipping a God I didn’t know. Even a few warriors left our traditions and started following this God whom they were calling “Jesus.” It really made me angry, and for nine years I persecuted the people in the church.

Determined to stop this chaos, I confronted the woman who started the church. I went to Sabina and jabbed my stick into her throat. “Why are you stealing my girls from me?” I shouted at her. She just stood there and calmly said, “I will teach anyone who wants to learn about my God!” Then, she cursed me saying, “You are a snake, and in the name of Jesus you will slither in the dirt !”

That night they began to sing songs about Jesus. I flew into a rage. I picked up a stick from the fire to beat them, but as soon as my hand touched that stick my mind completely left me. I couldn’t think clearly. I fell to the ground, and I began to eat dirt for weeks.

I don’t remember that time at all. All I remember is that when I woke up, I wanted to worship Jesus. Sabina told me that I lay like a snake on the ground for months ... and I begged her to pray for me.

I must have tired of lying on the ground because I finally agreed to serve her God. She prayed for me, and I immediately got my mind back. She told me, “Now your name will be Yona (Jonah), because you ran away from God just like Yona in the Bible.”


Most of  Yona’s village now serve Jesus. This testimony was excerpted from the photobook En Kátá. It can be purchased at en-kata.com. read more


Moms Get ‘Red Carpet’ Treatment

By the time most moms get their children ready for school, go to work, then come home and cook and clean, they’re too drained to pay attention to their own needs. But single mom Danette Crawford wants to help mothers feel appreciated—and pampered.

During her annual Mother’s Day Celebration, Crawford and her team bus in some 2,000 women from Hampton, Va., and surrounding cities, and shower them with love. Military wives whose husbands are deployed, widows, single moms, women from homeless shelters and assisted-living facilities all attend the event.

“When they first arrive, we give them the red carpet treatment,” says Crawford, who will sponsor her 10th celebration on May 9. “We give them a red rose or carnation, and a five-star meal. They have dinner with their children, and we just pamper them.”

The author of Don’t Quit in the Pit: Power to Turn Any Situation Around, Crawford provides activities for the children and shares the message of Jesus and teachings from her book with the women.

“When there’s no dad in the picture, these women go without honoring,” she says. “Our message is, ‘Don’t give up. You are loved.’” read more

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