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Hello My Name Is Marcus Yoars

And I’m the new editor of Charisma. If you’re annoyed at me for starting a sentence—worse still, an editor’s note (gasp!)—with the word and, I apologize ... but get used to it. Not the poor grammar, mind you, but the slightly different way of communicating. 

 

Charisma has been around awhile—35 years this summer—and, like every successful entity, must continually find ways to inject fresh ideas, perspective and stories into its life stream. 

Given that, I’m thrilled to announce some major changes with our magazine that I know you’ll like.

1) Nip, Tuck and Print—This issue shows off our major facelift on paper. It’s not always kosher to brag about such surgeries (unless you’re Joan Rivers), but we honestly think the magazine looks better than ever. We’ve nipped and tucked, reorganized and restructured to pack more in every issue, making it an easier read for today’s active lifestyle. The magazine’s main departments aim to do exactly what their titles indicate: inspire, inform and empower. We hope to inspire you with stories and images of everyday believers doing remarkable things. We’ll inform you through Charisma’s award-winning news stories—delivered in a slightly different manner now—of what the Holy Spirit is doing around the world. And we’ll empower you with resources, products and teachings that can help you in your spiritual journey.

2) Digital Sunrises—We continue to expand our online horizons with a digital issue that now offers a completely unique reading experience. Flip through the pages onscreen and you’ll find feature stories not included in the print version, as well as videos, podcasts, songs, photo galleries and other downloads. If you’re missing out on this, sign up at charismamag.com. Trust me, describing it on paper is like trying to paint a Caribbean sunrise without being there in person.

3) I’ll Take a Side of App, Please—Speaking of being present, did I mention we’ll also be unveiling our first app this month? Smartphone users can now get Charisma News stories as they break—anytime, anywhere—along with other features from our mobile-friendly environment. We’re also working on making Charisma available on as many e-reader platforms as possible. That is, if we can keep up with the ever-increasing number of new readers being released.

4) Remodeling the House—With more than 1 million visitors traipsing through last year, charismamag.com is starting to show a little wear and tear—the usual track marks on the carpet and dings on the door. Instead of needlessly tearing down the house, we think a simple remodeling job will do. Look for our Web site to be easier to navigate, more informative and more of a hub for believers than ever.

It’s a new day. New editor, new look, new platforms and new ways to communicate. Yet amid all the changes, I’m thankful Charisma’s vision remains the same. We’re still passionate about “Life in the Spirit” (our new tag line) and about telling the story of God at work in His people. In fact, I’m more excited than ever that we get to tell His story in so many new ways. I hope you are too—even if I start a few sentences with and.

 


 

CONTRIBUTING TO THIS ISSUE ...

Brian Zahnd, founding pastor of Word of Life Church in St. Joseph, Mo., has 1,390 Bob Dylan songs on his iPod. On his 40th birthday he climbed Kilimanjaro. And he drives a Harley-Davidson Road King. Enough said.

Founder and CEO of Community Solutions Consulting Services, Jeremy Del Rio discovered “living sacrifice” worship (Rom. 12) because he’s certifiably tone deaf and sings only joyful noise.

A former editor for Christian Retailing magazine, Orlando, Fla.-based freelance writer Lorie Coka enjoys finding a bargain anytime, anywhere. That’s especially true in the $1 section at Target. 

Writer Chad Bonham is from Broken Arrow, Okla. To this day, he maintains that Steven Curtis Chapman’s song “Dancing With the Dinosaur” was inspired by Barney, though he has no conclusive evidence to substantiate that claim. read more

Inheritance Transfer

In 1993, Pete Myers faced one of the toughest challenges in sports history. To that point, the 6-foot-6-inch journeyman had played sparingly for seven NBA teams in seven years. But prior to joining the Chicago Bulls that year, Myers was asked to do the impossible: Fill in for Michael Jordan after the greatest basketball player of all time abruptly decided to retire (for the first time).

I’m thankful I don’t face as daunting a task as Myers did—not because the person I’m replacing isn’t as extraordinary, but because of the remarkable inheritance he’s left behind and the way it’s being transferred. Lee Grady is one of the most distinct and respected voices in Christian journalism today. After serving Charisma for 17 years, he’s made my task of following in his footsteps extremely challenging. Yet one thing I love about Lee is that he’s never wanted me to trace his trail, but instead to blaze one for myself. As anyone close to him knows, Lee leads by empowering. He believes in handing over the necessary tools to let people run their own course, all while he offers them his unconditional support.

The church desperately needs more Lee Gradys right now. We need battle-proven generals who are willing to make way for and empower a new generation of passionate, Spirit-filled leaders. We need veterans with proven wisdom to help guide those eager to venture further.

But let me remind my fellow emergents of this two-sided coin: We may be blazing new trails, but we must not neglect the wisdom of the pioneers who came before us. Our success will be directly proportional to how well we listened to the voice of God speaking through our predecessors. If the church is to truly flourish in the next season, young and old must understand the need for intergenerational conversation, not monogenerational monologues.

This month Charisma highlights the Spirit-prompted generational transfer already in process—and shown in places such as Tulsa, Oklahoma, where the ongoing Empowered21 conversations will be celebrated April 8-10. We believe these pivotal multigenerational gatherings offer hope for all ages. Because as in this magazine’s transfer from one editor to the next, those involved understand that the state of the generational inheritance usually matters more than the individual inheritors.


Marcus Yoars is Charisma’s new editor. read more

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Charisma Magazine — Empowering believers for life in the Spirit