Last Ounce of Courage
A scene from 'Last Ounce of Courage' (Veritas Entertainment)

If you find it difficult to get stirred up about what is happening to the moral structure of this country, then perhaps you should go see the film Last Ounce of Courage, which releases in theaters nationwide on Friday.

In the midst of an era where political correctness has engulfed the nation and the phrase “separation of church and state” is bandied about constantly, the concept of freedom in the United States and what our soldiers have fought for has quietly faded into the background.

Last Ounce of Courage makes the viewer acutely aware that our religious freedom is in danger, despite what is says in the First Amendment of the Constitution: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof …”

The movie’s main character, Bob Revere (Marshall Teague) says, “I’ve been sitting around here watching it (our freedom) disappear just like everyone else. What makes me any different than the next guy that just does nothing? … We can’t be silent anymore.”

That’s sobering. Sad as it is, it is a shadow of what has happened in America. One needn’t look any further than the recent Chick-fil-A saga to see that our freedom of speech is under major attack.

As for the film, Revere, a veteran himself, decides that he no longer will conform to the evolution that is taking place. As the mayor, Revere decides to honor his son who was killed 14 years previously by bringing the true meaning of Christmas back to his small town. His actions don’t come without reprisal; opposition arises in the form of American Civil Liberties Organization attorney Warren “The Hammer” Hammerschmidt (Fred Williamson).

With the help of his grandson—whose father was killed in the Middle East—and the rest of his family, Revere carries out his mission, insisting no constitutional statutes have been violated. Revere’s courage to stand up for his belief in Jesus Christ, while infringing on no one else’s, is incredibly inspirational.

Teague, who starred alongside Patrick Swayze in the 1989 film Road House and has made 34 other feature films and dozens of television appearances, gives a brilliant performance as the lead character. The film also stars Jennifer O’Neill as Bob’s wife, Dottie, and Nikki Novak as the Reveres’ daughter-in-law, Kari.

Not one of his previous movies, however, have meant as much to Teague as Last Ounce of Courage.

“I don’t think I’ve ever done anything else in my 30-year acting career that has impacted my life like this movie,” Teague said. “It’s rare that a role like this comes around. The minute I read the script, I knew it was special.”

Actor and New York Times best-selling author Chuck Norris, a good friend of Teague’s, had the same sentiments. Norris has given his official stamp of approval on the film.

The sacrifices of the men and women of the United States armed forces served as motivation for Darrel Campbell, who wrote the script, co-directed and starred in the film. While it’s a story centered around one family and its struggles following the loss of one of its own in battle, the film’s central theme is freedom and honoring those who paid a price for America to maintain it.

“It is really about those who have sacrificed for us,” Campbell said. “I put it in the words of our main character, Bob: ‘The real heroes are the ones that gave us their last full measure of devotion,’ that last ounce of courage.

“What about those who gave a limb, their eyesight or their mind? Those people are still around to struggle. They must ask themselves, ‘What did I do that for?’ That shouldn’t happen in this country.”

Without giving away the final moments of the film, it’s recommended to bring a pack of tissues. Last Ounce of Courage is a real tearjerker.

The movie has no political agenda, and Campbell said it wasn’t intentional for the film to be released only two months prior to what many are touting as one of the most critical presidential elections in our country’s history.

“This film is really an expression of how important the Constitution is,” Campbell said. “Let’s stand on the Constitution. If you have a problem with it, there are ways of changing that. Right now, we have a constitutional right to express our thoughts and feelings. Don’t start taking things away from me that are constitutional.”

Bob Revere couldn’t have said it better himself.

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