Marshall Teague
Marshall Teague (Veritas Entertainment)

The minute Marshall Teague picked up the script for Last Ounce of Courage, he knew it was a project in which he wanted to participate. In fact, he had never felt more moved to take on a role in his entire acting career.

Teague, who has appeared in more than 35 feature films and more than 100 television shows, knew right away he wanted to play Last Ounce’s lead role of Bob Revere simply because he and the character are so similar. In essence, he said he is Revere—a veteran who loves his country and who will fight to keep intact the freedoms for which he served and sacrificed.

“It is very rare that when you talk about actors and their roles, you come across something that impacts your heart so much,” said Teague, perhaps best known for playing opposite Patrick Swayze in the film Roadhouse. “This movie has a meaning, a meaning that is something I sincerely believe in. It’s about our right to express ourselves in any way we choose.

“Bob’s beliefs are my beliefs, and Bob’s heart is my heart. This role captured a part of my soul. I knew right away I had to do this film.”

Last Ounce of Courage, which opens nationwide Sept. 14, tells the story of a grieving father inspired by his grandson to take a stand for faith and freedom in an age of apathy and vanishing liberty in America.

A born-again Christian, Teague believes the movie is more of a patriotic film that portrays Christian values.

“Everyone needs to find their voice and stand up for what they believe in, no matter what,” Teague commented. “If we want to stand up and say that we love God and we believe in Jesus Christ, then no one should have the right to say that we can’t. A lot of men and women have died to protect that right.”

With his parents’ permission, Teague enlisted in the Navy at 17, serving in Southeast Asia and Europe. He retired from the Navy after a few years due to injuries he received while active in service.

Teague’s character in the film is a highly decorated combat veteran. When his son is deployed to the Middle East and later loses his life, Revere falls into a funk for several years. It is not until his grandson (Hunter Gomez) and his daughter-in law (Nikki Novak) come to stay with him and his wife (Jennifer O’Neill) that he finds motivation to carry on by taking on a project that will honor his fallen son.

As a small-town mayor, Revere lights a fire under his community by bringing back the true meaning of Christmas, which had been missing for years in the name of political correctness. In the process, opposition by the American Civil Liberties Organization arises, but Revere’s firm stand for his beliefs revives the townspeople’s sense of patriotism, including a group of youth, led by Gomez.

“This film is an expression of how important the Constitution is. Bob Revere makes it known that he will not have his freedoms that are guaranteed in the Constitution taken away,” said Darrel Campbell, who wrote the script, produced and acted in the film. “I don’t know that we could made a better choice than Marshall to play Bob. He played the character with such conviction and heart. His performance is only one of the reasons we’re proud of this film.”

Teague continuously lends his support to American veterans and soldiers whenever he can. In 2006, he and his good friend, actor and author Chuck Norris, spent three weeks in Iraq on a USO tour.

They visited 13 Forward Operating bases and shook hands with more than 1,800 U.S. soldiers.

“There has never been a soldier I have ever met that wakes up in the morning and cannot wait to go to war,” Teague explained. “Our soldiers serve for a reason, and that’s because of what this country stands for. It’s freedom. If you don’t have freedom, you can’t enjoy your religion. It’s not called the Bill of Entitlements; it’s called the Bill of Rights. Some people need to revisit what that actually means.”

After doing Last Ounce of Courage, Teague said his career is complete, even if he never gets in front of the camera again.

“If this is the last movie I am ever allowed to do, I would be satisfied,” Teague said. “I did the movie I wanted to do from my heart, and I’m grateful to God that he allowed me to do it. It’s the film of which I am going to be the most proud.”

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